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Travis Broussard


Occupation ▪ VP of Business Development & Marketing at the Alliance Safety Council
Wife ▪ Summer
Children ▪ Brilee, 17; Brady, 12; Brennan, 10; Brycen, 5; and Braxton, 4
Hobbies ▪ Camping, rafting, and anything outdoors

Filled with fun stories and jokes that will have you laughing, Travis Broussard is not only a wonderful friend to all, but he’s an incredible father to his five children.

Travis takes the “all in” approach to life, making sure that when he is with family, he is 100 percent with his wife and kiddos–no phones, no distractions. He adores his time with his family, whether they’re spending time on the ball field, making s’mores in the backyard, or taking family trips together that they will all remember for a lifetime.

Tell me about your children.
T:
Brilee is amazing. She’s a fantastic athlete and just received a scholarship to play softball. She has such a big heart. She’s goofy and loving life. Brady is a soccer player, but he’s also our artist. He draws, plays guitar, and he’s always telling jokes. Brennan is competitive. He’s a great athlete, and everything he does, he puts everything into it. He’s also a math whiz. Brycen is the funniest kid I have ever met. He does magic tricks, loves his hair, and he plays baseball. He’s a bit of a showboat whenever he scores. Braxton is extra cute. He’s full of energy, sweet and tenderhearted. He definitely gives us a run for our money.

What do  you like to do together as a family?
T:
We’re always at a game or on a field, whether we’re watching LSU or the Saints or eating wings. We’re always with family. We also have a place that is great for entertaining.  We make s’mores in the backyard, and we go on camping trips.

What’s the greatest thing about being a dad?
T:
It’s amazing to stop and watch them and realize, “We made that!” You get to see them become their own person with their own goals and ambitions. It’s so rewarding.

How has parenthood changed you?
T:
It has changed everything for me. I’m not sure you fully become whole until you have kids. You very seldom think about yourself now. You’re more compassionate and empathetic. I was a complete mess before my wife and children.

What did you have as a child that kids today don’t have?
T:
Dial-up Internet and having to run cords to download music from Napster. They have no idea what they have now.

What kind of dad are you?
T:
I’d like to think I am a loving and caring father. My faith helps me to put things into perspective. I’m a fun dad. My wife keeps everything in order. I’m known to create chaos and she always calms them down.

What do you love most about your job?
T:
The people and the organization. It was a 60 year start up, and we care about the worker. We work to make sure that they can go to work and go home to their families. 

How do you find the balance between work and family time?
T:
There’s a lot of talk about balance, and honestly, you can’t balance; you just have to be all in. It’s all about presence. If you’re at work, you have to be 100 percent at work. If you’re at home, you have to put the phone away and be at the dinner table with your family. 

What advice do you often give your kids?
T:
I always talk to them about not being afraid. I’m always pushing them to take chances, encouraging them to go and try new things. Life is what you make it.

What is the best parenting advice you have ever received?
T:
My mom and dad did a good job of allowing us to be who we are. They let me know that they were here for me, they would pick me up when I fell, but they wanted me to make decisions. 

What do you do to take care of yourself?
T:
I decided that I was going to make big changes this year. I’ve started exercising and journaling. I’ve been writing down things that are racing through my head at night, and it has helped. It’s like, “I hear you, I got it down.”

What was your first job?
T:
I worked at a car wash. I was 14 years old, washing all the cool cars and trucks, and I just remember taking so much pride in my work. I loved seeing their faces after. I knew then I wanted to be in the service business.

Which family member has been your greatest role model in life?
T:
My grandfather. I always respected him. He gives the greatest advice. I remember watching him love my grandmother so much. When she got sick, he took care of her and did all of the cooking and cleaning. He challenged me to be a better man, father, and husband.

Do you have any advice for other parents?
T:
The biggest advice is you’re not alone. We all feel like our lives are the busiest, our kids are the craziest, we’re always behind...but you’re not. Everyone is in it. Take time to get together with other couples, reach for help, and you’ll see you’re not alone. ■

Q&A
The parenting item I couldn’t live without…
Alexa.
In my fridge, you will always find…milk. We go through eight gallons a week.
Favorite movie growing up…The Goonies.
My guilty pleasure is…Oreos.
Music I’m loving…a lot of Christian artists, especially Zach Williams.
I feel my best when I…take time to read my Bible and pray.
My favorite television show is...Everybody Loves Raymond.
My favorite ice cream is...Moose Tracks.

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30 Sep 2019


By Amanda Miller

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