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Take it Back


Socialization is a major component of our existence. It is a determining factor in others’ opinions of our character. Since we do not reside in Utopia, we make mistakes. These mistakes are evidenced in our conversations and physical interactions. We do not want others to perceive us as undisciplined, rude, or unkind. 

Lessons from childhood taught us that when we offend someone, we should state, “I take it back.” Sometimes, this action is of our own volition, or it can be prompted by another who emphatically states, “Take that back!” What does that mean? Simply stated? “I’m sorry.” 

I have learned that there are things that never come back. One of those is spoken word. So, if I “take back” the offensive words, does that mean it has been eradicated from time? No. Does it mean the person instantly forgets what has been said? No. It is an acknowledgement of wrongdoing. Second is the desire to achieve harmony; third, a return to “business as usual”-removing the incident from a peaceful co-existence; and finally, a request/a plea to forgive the words or the action that inflicted pain. 

It should become ingrained in our character of lessons and actions learned to not be repeated. Whether it is children in school or adults in all interpersonal relationships, we all have moments when we wish we could take it back. Instead, simply state, “I am sorry, please forgive me.”

God has presented the ensample of forgiveness through His son, Jesus, the Christ while on His earthly Ministry. We are instructed to forgive those who “trespass against us,” that we will be forgiven when we trespass (Matthew 8:14-15). We are further instructed to forgive multiples, if necessary, because that same privilege is extended to us (Matthew 18:21-22). The ultimate act of forgiveness is found at the Cross at Calvary when the request to forgive was uttered from Jesus’s lips as He was being crucified for the sins (“take it back” moments) of the World (Luke 23:34).

Our response when we hear, “I take it back” or “take it back,” should be “I forgive you” or “I am sorry.” That is the Godly way to take it back. ■

Reviews

1 Review
Magen
McComb, MS
Brilliant

This is a great article and something very important to think about. Our words carry weight and we should be a careful with them. But we all make mistakes and asking for forgiveness is a great first step in moving forward.

April 2019

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01 Apr 2019


By Yvonne Williams

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