Michael Wyatt


By Joy Holden

 

Turning nothing into something is one of Michael Wyatt’s greatest passions in life. He values hard work and commitment to the project at hand. Michael has served our country as a Marine and our city as a police officer, and he now serves his family. Though he dedicated many years to public service, he is now working as a process technician and will graduate in December with his Associate’s degree in process technology. Michael not only works and studies full time, but he also finds joy in creating furniture and sculptures out of wood for his family. No matter what he faces, Michael will put his heart and hands to good use for his family, his community, and his country.

How did you meet your significant other?

Mutual friends had been wanting to introduce us. We actually met at Laser Tag in 2010 on a group date. We’ve been married three years.

If your life were a song, which song would it be?

“Live Until I Die” by Clay Walker.

Three things you always have with you?

Pocket knife, wallet, and a spare truck key because I have a phobia of being locked out of my truck. It comes from my days in law enforcement and always having a spare for my police car.

Three words to describe yourself?

Hardworking, proud, and a thinker.

How would your friends describe you?

Loyal, honest almost to a fault, and sarcastic.

First thing you notice about people when you meet them?

I notice the type of clothes and footwear people are wearing. From my days in law enforcement and the Marines, I am trained that way.

Most recent proud parenting moment?

My daughter is putting her shoes on by herself.

Last daddy fail?

I was under my truck fixing something, and my baby girl was outside playing in her little orange and yellow car that she Flintstones around in. I heard the car flip over and her whining. She’s a bit dramatic so I asked her if she was okay, and she said, “No.” I got out from under my truck and she was halfway pinned under her little car. I felt awful!

Greatest thing about being a dad?

I get to help pass on values and convictions to the next generation. For my little girl, I want her to look for someone one day with the same values as me. For my son, I want to raise him to treat women the same way I treat his mom. I want them both to be hardworking and self-sufficient.

If you could invite anyone over for dinner, who would you invite?

I would invite my Grandma on my dad’s side. She passed away before she could meet my wife or my daughter.

What’s something parents shouldn’t feel guilty about?

For fussing at your kids for doing something they could get hurt doing.

What good habit do you have that you would like to pass on to the kids?

Self-sufficiency, and working with their hands to be independent.

Any bad habits you would not want to pass on?

I am pretty gruff, probably from my time as a Marine. I can be pretty blunt. I want them to be honest, but more tactful than I am.

Superpower you wish you had?

I would like to have superhuman strength and endurance so I don’t get tired before my two year old.

What would people be surprised to learn about you?

I designed and built my daughter’s crib from scratch without plans. I like to build furniture for my family.

How did you react when you found out you were going to be a dad?

I hugged my wife and I felt a lot of joy, but uncertainty hit me when the reality sunk in.

What’s one piece of advice you often give your children?

Be careful. I try to stay away from telling my daughter that she is going to fall because that sets her up for failure, but I want her to do what she is doing with care.

How has parenthood changed you?

I try to be more careful and mindful of what I say and do. I also realize there is always someone watching everything I do.

If you had 24 hours all to yourself, what would you do?

I would sleep in, then sit outside and drink coffee. I would get started on a woodworking project and work all day on it. Then, I would sit on the back porch and watch the sun dip below the tree line.

What advice would you give to other parents?

Teach the kids to be proud of the work they put into something as well as the finished product. Even in a loss, they can still be proud of their effort. 

 

Fill in the blank!

Before kids, I never thought I would… sit down and watch kids’ cartoons.

The parenting item I couldn’t live without… the babysitter.

Favorite movie growing up… The Cowboy Way.

My guilty pleasure is… an Oreo Blast or Blizzard with extra Oreo.

Favorite children’s book is.... Where the Wild Things Are.

Growing up, I knew I wanted to… be a pilot. My mom says I used to say I wanted to fly planes.

I can’t stop listening to... Prime Country on Sirius. It’s 80s/90s country. 

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30 Nov 2016


By Joy Holden

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