Advertisement

Choosing the Right Camp


By Maeve Thompson

 

Camps are about learning as much as they’re about fun. Through hands-on experiences, unique challenges, and cooperative tasks with newly-made friends, those stories about camp will resonate for a lifetime. So picking the right camp is critical. Knowing a few very important questions ahead of time and following these tips for choosing the right camp will ensure you match a child’s interests to the right camp. 

Is your child ready?

This may seem like a simple question, but it is a key one. Before investigating camps, make sure your child is ready to attend. Transitions are usually easy with school aged children in day camps, but overnight camps require more maturity and independence that differ with a child’s development. Children who do well at sleepovers or have been on family weekend camping trips are more likely to transition easier when away from home. You might also ask if a camp offers a one or two night trial sleepover before committing to a longer-term overnight camp. However, if you’re a helicopter parent who’s the one that’s nervous about an overnight stay, either accept the fact that camp is about the child and not you, or don’t look into overnight camps in the first place.

What are your child’s interests?

Involve your child.

General camps offer a variety of activities that range from outdoor sports to craft activities. However, if your child dreams he’s a Rembrandt, yearns to win the Olympic canoe racing event, or finds telescopes and outer space his mission in life, there are plenty of specialty camps that match a specific focus with the child’s interests. Special needs camps are also a primary consideration. After plugging into your child’s interests, you can decide if day or residential camps are right for your child.

Get started early, and do your research.

Some camps fill up quickly, so don’t wait until school’s almost out to decide camp is a good idea. Some camps even start accepting registrations a year ahead. Once you’ve answered some basic questions with your child about what kind of camp you’re looking for, talk to the camp advisors and schedule a conversation with the camp director. Have a list of questions that you consider critical factors to help you ask the right questions. Once you’ve narrowed down the field of camps, ask them to send you an information package. Also, be sure and visit their websites to learn more about them, view pictures and videos, and read comments from other parents or children about their experiences. If a camp has a Facebook page, this can tell you a lot about its participants and atmosphere. Sign up for emails and ask for any information about the schedules of the camps or special event notices. Read the fine print concerning prices, cancellation policies, and regulations. 

Make the choice with the child.

Whether your child is fifteen or five, let him know he’s had a choice in the type of camp that you choose together. Help build the excitement of camp by pointing out the fun and exciting adventures that await. Camp is usually a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and your initial legwork and follow-up actions make it stress-free for all.

Be the first to review this item!


Bookmark this

05 Aug 2016


Recent Articles more articles

It's Time to Party!

in Party

Before your birthday girl can make a wish and blow out the candles, there’s a lot of planning to be done. Don’t worry, though! We are here to help. From choosing a theme and sending out invitations to ordering a cake and scheduling entertainment, we

July 2018 Books

in Turn the Page

Turn the Page.

Unknown Costs of Raising a Child with Special Needs

in Health and Wellness, Family Life

Talking about money is a taboo in our culture, but sometimes the lack of available information leaves families bewildered when they find themselves in unusual circumstances. Nobody plans on having a child who has a disability, but life doesn’t always

Louisiana Pediatric Cardiology Foundation

in Local Profile

In the United States, a young competitive athlete dies every three days due to sudden cardiac death, and often the cause is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This fatal condition can go undiagnosed through physicals. Heart screens, however, can show

Featured Listings more listings

Baton Rouge International School

in Private Schools

The Baton Rouge International School is an independent, non-profit American school offering a rigorous College preparatory curriculum in a multilingual environment (English, French, Spanish and Chinese) from preschool through 12th grade.

Sacred Heart of Jesus School

in Private Schools

Steeped in Catholic tradition, Sacred Heart of Jesus School is a diverse community dedicated to educating the mind, body and spirit.

Advertisement
Newsletter